Somen Debnath | Cycling around the world for AIDS awareness

Somen Debnath has been travelling across the world on a bicycle to spread awareness about HIV/AIDS. Starting from his home at Basanti Village in South 24 Paragana district of West Bengal at the age of 21 on 27 May 2004, Debnath has been on the road and travelled over 185,400 km and visited 170 countries. During his journey, he was in Baghdad, Iraq for a few days in 2013. I then met him and interacted with him during his stay in Baghdad. Continue reading Somen Debnath | Cycling around the world for AIDS awareness

Epic Moment | Successful Change Management

When something is memorable, it means that it is easily remembered, particularly if it is something special or out of the ordinary. These are experiences which involve anticipation, emotional involvement, and altered perceptions of time – think about how “time flies when you’re having fun,” and they involve a process of doing and undergoing. I recollected one such memorable experience, which I still remember. Continue reading Epic Moment | Successful Change Management

In Search of Guru Nanak’s Shrine in Baghdad

Guru Nanak, the founder of Sikhism, spent three months in Baghdad with his associates Bhai Mardana and Bhai Bala on his return to India from Mecca. The holy site is in the backyard of Baghdad railway station surrounded by graveyards. War, insurgents or looters have wiped any trace of a historical footnote that had preserved the memory of the Sikh Guru’s 16th-century journey through Arabia and his stay in Baghdad. There is no trace of anything Sikh on the site now. Continue reading In Search of Guru Nanak’s Shrine in Baghdad

90 Days by Anirudhya Mitra | Story of the Hunt for Rajiv Gandhi’s Assassins

After 30 years, Anirudhya Mitra narrates his experiences as a journalist in India Today covering the drama of the hunt for Rajiv Gandhi’s assassins. The excruciating attention to detail and research are commendable even as the author struggles to condense such thrilling stuff into a cogent and accessible narrative. I appreciate Anirudhya Mitra for writing the book, albeit a bit late, and for providing a deeper understanding of the circumstances, possibilities, and cover-ups. Continue reading 90 Days by Anirudhya Mitra | Story of the Hunt for Rajiv Gandhi’s Assassins

Are Greed & Stupidity Causes of Recession?

A recession is a business cycle contraction when there is a general decline in economic activity. We have seen just as the market can become overwhelmed with greed; it can also succumb to fear. Just as greed dominates the market during a boom, fear prevails following its bust.The recession is nothing but the greed of big businesses to be more profitable by reducing quality and using unfair practices and also of careless arrogant employees giving pathetic service as long as profits are coming. Continue reading Are Greed & Stupidity Causes of Recession?

Decorating Goddess Durga

The prominence of the worship of Durga dates back to a time in history that can best be described as the hoary past often considered to be similar in nature to the gradual development of mother and nature worship across the globe. The ornamentation is evolving through the ages. There were mainly two kinds of embellishments or saaj that used to be made then – sholar saaj and daker saaj. But nothing remains forever. Now, Durga idols are decorated with colourful sarees and ornaments. Continue reading Decorating Goddess Durga

Golden Lyre of Ur | Mesopotamia

It is unknown which culture was the first to create music, but a set of beautiful Sumerian instruments from the city of Ur provide us with some insight into the world of ancient music. The famous Lyres of Ur, which are somewhat similar to modern harps, are the oldest stringed instruments unearthed to date. The Golden Lyre, found in the Great Death Pit at the Royal Cemetery of Ur (in southern Iraq), got its name because the whole head of the bull is made of gold. The eyes are made of inlaid mother-of-pearl and lapis lazuli. Research has shown that the bull played a key role in the religious imagination of the Sumerians: it could serve as the deity’s divine animal or the god himself could take on the form of a bull. Continue reading Golden Lyre of Ur | Mesopotamia

Agatha Christie Lived in Baghdad

Agatha Christie doesn’t need any introduction. We grew up reading the detective novels of the British writer, who authored 66 detective novels and 14 short story collections, particularly those revolving around fictional detectives Hercule Poirot and Miss Marple. According to UNESCO’s Index Translationum, she remains the most-translated individual author. After a devastating divorce, she took a trip to Baghdad in 1928 and lost her heart — to the ancient sites of Iraq and archaeologist Max Mallowan. Continue reading Agatha Christie Lived in Baghdad

World Humanitarian Day | 19 August

Each year, World Humanitarian Day (August 19) focuses on a theme, bringing together partners from across the humanitarian system to advocate for the survival, well-being and dignity of people affected by crises, and for the safety and security of aid workers. This year, the highlight is on the immediate human cost of the climate crisis by pressuring world leaders to take meaningful climate action for the world’s most vulnerable people. Continue reading World Humanitarian Day | 19 August

Sri Aurobindo | Prophet of Indian Nationalism

Today as we celebrate the 75 years of Independence of India, it’s also the 150th birth anniversary of Sri Aurobindo. The bedrock of the political philosophy of Sri Aurobindo was his concept of spiritual nationalism and the divinity of the motherland. His theory of Spiritual Nationalism is a great synthesis of philosophies of both east and west integrated into one philosophy. His philosophy of Spiritual Nationalism is for the benefit of humanity and not just Indians. He envisaged a new society and a new civilization. Continue reading Sri Aurobindo | Prophet of Indian Nationalism