Maha Kumbh Mela | In search of the divine nectar

Kumbh derives its name from the immortal Pot of Nectar, which the Demigods (Devtas) and Demons (Asuras) fought over, described in ancient Vedic scriptures known as the Puranas. It is these Vedic literatures that have stood the test of time, out of which the tradition has evolved into the one that the world now knows as The Kumbh Mela or The Kumbha Mela. The festival is one of the largest peaceful gatherings in the world, and considered as the “world’s largest congregation of religious pilgrims”.

Karma Puja

The Karma Puja is a festival of agriculture and is very sacred to the indigenous peoples in the Indian states of Jharkhand, Bihar, Madhya Pradesh, Chhattisgarh, Odisha, West Bengal and Assam. Tribes like Baiga, Oraon, Binjhwari, Munda, Majhwar, Ho, Khortha, Korba, Santhal, Nagpuri and many more tribal communities celebrate this festival.

Hanuman Tok, Gangtok

According to the local legends, when Hanuman was flying with the mountain with Sanjeevani herbs (mythological life saving herb) to save Lord Rama's brother Lakshmana, he rested at this spot for some time where his temple now lies. The locals used to worship a stone here for centuries. The temple is popularly known as wish-fulfilling temple.

Twin Holy Cities | Rishikesh and Haridwar

Hari means “Lord Vishnu”. So, Haridwar stands for “The Gateway to Lord Vishnu”. In order to reach Badrinath, one of the Char Dhams, with a temple of Lord Vishnu, Haridwar is a typical place to start a pilgrim’s journey. Therefore, the name Haridwar. Hrishikesh (हृषीकेश) is a name of Lord Vishnu composed of hrishika meaning ‘senses’ and Isha meaning ‘lord’, thus ‘Lord of the Senses’. The name commemorates an apparition of Vishnu to Raibhya Rishi, as a result of his Tapasya (austerities), as Lord Hrishikesha.

Konark Sun Temple

On the shores of the Bay of Bengal, bathed in the rays of the rising sun, the temple at Konarak is a monumental representation of the sun god Surya's chariot; its 24 wheels are decorated with symbolic designs and it is led by a team of six horses. Built in the 13th century, it is one of India's most famous Hindu sanctuaries. The temple is attributed to king Narasimhadeva I of the Eastern Ganga Dynasty about 1250 CE.

Gangasagar | Where the river meets the sea

The Kapil Muni Temple

Gangasagar is a charming tourist destination, which attracts both pilgrims and adventure lovers. Nestled in one of the delta islands is Gangasagar. Also called Sagardwip or Sagar Island, it is one of the largest islands on the Ganges delta and holds immense religious significance. Gangasagar has acres of silver sand and clear blue sky, and the calm sea to spend the time in tranquillity.

Sarhul Festival

Sarhul is one of the grand festivals of tribals in Jharkhand. This annual festival is celebrated during the spring season when trees and other elements of nature are worshiped. Sarhul literally means ‘Worship of Sal’. Sarhul festival is dedicated to Dharti mata — Mother Earth.