A PM brought down by a font

You may have sent an Outlook email to the wrong person or accidentally opened an embarrassing PowerPoint during a meeting, but for Pakistan’s Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif, one of Microsoft’s products became a real problem. He has been forced to resign after he was disqualified from office by the country’s top court.

A river is now legally a person

A river in New Zealand has become the first in the world to be legally recognised as a living entity and granted the same rights as a human. The sacred river will be granted all the corresponding rights, duties and liabilities of a legal person after a 170-year battle led by a local Maori tribe known as the Iwi. Rights of Nature or granting legal personhood to nature may finally provide balance in legal systems around the world that tend to view nature as only an economic resource for humans.

ISRO launched 104 satellites in one mission

India has created history today by successfully launching 104 satellites on a single mission, overtaking the previous record for most spacecraft launched at a single attempt, which currently stands at the thirty-eight orbited by Russia’s Dnepr in June 2014, of which thirty-two were deployed from the rocket itself while a thirty-third failed to separate. Salute to ISRO scientists!

Post-truth: Word of the Year 2016

The concept of post-truth has been in existence for the past decade, but Oxford Dictionaries has seen a spike in frequency this year in the context of the EU referendum in the United Kingdom and the presidential election in the United States. It has also become associated with a particular noun, in the phrase post-truth politics.

Fainter Harvest Moon tonight

The full moon known as this year’s Harvest Moon — a moon that appears bigger and brighter than usual due to its close proximity to earth — rises tonight coincided with a minor, penumbral lunar eclipse for many people in Asia and Africa. That won’t happen again until 2024.

Letter gets there by hand-drawn map

There are many stories of messages in bottles travelling thousands of miles before being picked up and read, and letters arriving decades after they were posted. But here is a different twist. Instead of a postal address or a recipient’s name, the sender had drawn a map of where they believed the addressee to be. And, extraordinarily, it arrived at the right place. Amazing, anything is possible in the world!