Se Cathedral | The largest church in Asia

The Sé Catedral de Santa Catarina, known as Se Cathedral, is the cathedral of the Latin Rite Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Goa and Daman and the seat of the Patriarch of the East Indies. It is located in Old Goa, India. The word Sé is Portuguese for See. An episcopal see is, in the usual meaning of the phrase, the area of a bishop's ecclesiastical jurisdiction.

Viceroy’s Arch, Old Goa

The European colonialism has its roots in Goa with the establishment of a Portuguese colony in the 16th century. Among the time-honoured vestiges of by-gone Portuguese era, the Viceroy Gate is of particular interest. It was the gateway to new era of colonialism in India and followed by British  Imperialism. The Viceroy’s arch in Old…

Ajanta Caves | Rock-cut cave monuments

The Ajanta Caves are 30 rock-cut Buddhist cave monuments which date from the 2nd century BCE to about 480 CE in Aurangabad district of Maharashtra state of India. The first Buddhist cave monuments at Ajanta date from the 2nd and 1st centuries BCE. During the Gupta period (5th and 6th centuries CE), many more richly decorated caves were added to the original group. The paintings and sculptures of Ajanta, considered masterpieces of Buddhist religious art, have had a considerable artistic influence. The caves were designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1983.

Monument of storytelling

An unparalleled monument to the ageless art of story-telling, the tales of the One Thousand and One Nights have, for many centuries, titillated the imaginations of generations the world over. With her hair flowing down her back, her mouth curved into just the hint of a smile, her bronze hands gesturing gracefully, she spins tales of thieves and sailors and magic lamps for King Shahryar, who reclines in front of her.

Al-Kadhimiya Mosque, Baghdad

Al-Kadhimiya Mosque is a shrine located in the northern neighbourhood of Kadhimiya district in Baghdad on the west bank of river Tigris. It contains the tombs of the seventh Shia’i Imam Musa Al-Kadhim and the ninth Shia’i Imam Muhammad al-Jawad. Also buried within this mosque are the famous historical scholars, Shaikh Mufid and Shaikh Nasir ad-Dīn aṭ-Ṭusi. Due to its special geographical location, Kadhimiya has been considered important and its history is thought to date back before Jesus Christ. This place was then known as Shoneezi, an Arab name meaning the Black Grain.

Gopalpur-on-sea | A perfect winter vacation

Gopalpur is the perfect place for holidays. During the days of Kalingas, this place was known as the port of Paloura from which traders sailed as far as Java, Bali and Sumatra and piled up wealth dealing in silk and pearl. Later Gopalpur regained its importance to maritime trade during British colonial rule. It was a transit point to export sugar and cheap labourers for the tea gardens of Assam in north-eastern India. Today it survives on fishing as its main industry, and a pristine beach with unforgettable views of the sunrise.

Kahramana | An iconic statue in Baghdad

There is a statue of a beautiful young girl carrying a jar and pouring water down and surrounded by another forty jars around her on the crossroads between the famous Karrada Dakhil (the inner district) and Karrada Kharij (the outer district) in the capital city of Baghdad. Her name is Kahramana.

Beirut | Pigeons’ Rock

The Raouché, a timeless symbol of Lebanese capital Beirut is its most famous landmark. Off the coast of Raouché, there is a natural landmark called the Pigeons' Rock, its Arabic name translates to rock and is believed to be a derivative of the French word rocher. It is also known as the Rock of Raouché. This 60-meter high offshore rock couple was formed in the prehistoric era by a geologic movement. These two huge rock formations, made of sedimentary pale soft porous limestone rock eroded over millions of years, stand like gigantic sentinels on the Mediterranean Sea.

Bullet marks at Jallianwala Bagh

Ninety-eight years ago, one of the bloodiest actions of British rule was the calculated massacre of close to 2,000 innocent Indians at the Jallianwala Bagh in Amritsar (Punjab). The firing was ordered by an officer of the British colonial power, General Dyer. While the official figure for lives lost was 1,526 the actual figure was reportedly much higher.