Mukteshvara Temple

Mukteshvara means “Lord of Freedom”. The temple is dedicated to Lord Shiva. Located in the capital city Bhubaneswar, the Mukteshvara Temple is a regal monument that dates back to the 9th-10th century CE. Mukteswar temple is literally a dream realized in sandstone. The temple is said to be the structure, where sculpture and architecture are in synchronization with one another. The Mukteshvara Temple is the finest example of a perfect blend between sculpting and architecture.

Historical Udayagiri & Khandagiri Caves

The hills of Udayagiri and Khandagiri located on the outskirts of Odisha’s capital, Bhubaneswar, are historic remnants of India’s rich past. The hills house a number of caves, most of which have been carved out as residential blocks for Jain monks during the reign of King Kharavela of the Mahameghavahana dynasty. Not only are these caves testimony to the architectural genius of ancient India, they also bear messages of love, compassion, and religious tolerance.

Gopalpur-on-sea: Perfect Winter Destination

Gopalpur is the perfect place for holidays. During the days of Kalingas, this place was known as the port of Paloura from which traders sailed as far as Java, Bali and Sumatra and piled up wealth dealing in silk and pearl. Later Gopalpur regained its importance to maritime trade during British colonial rule. It was a transit point to export sugar and cheap labourers for the tea gardens of Assam in north-eastern India. Today it survives on fishing as its main industry, and a pristine beach with unforgettable views of the sunrise.

The Konark Sun Temple

On the shores of the Bay of Bengal, bathed in the rays of the rising sun, the temple at Konarak is a monumental representation of the sun god Surya's chariot; its 24 wheels are decorated with symbolic designs and it is led by a team of six horses. Built in the 13th century, it is one of India's most famous Hindu sanctuaries. The temple is attributed to king Narasimhadeva I of the Eastern Ganga Dynasty about 1250 CE.