Iraq Museum: Refuge for relics of the past

March 21 is a public holiday in Iraq to mark celebration of the Kurdish New Year – Nowruz. This year, the Iraqi government declared Thursday, March 22 also a public holiday. It’s therefore a long weekend for us. We decided to visit the National Museum of Iraq, also known as the Iraq Museum on Thursday. There was a conference also going on the “The Lady of Warka.” The staff is very polite. One museum official gave us a map of the museum to guide us through various halls in this two-storied museum dedicated to the collection and interpretation of the history of Iraq and its environs. The collections consist of mainly man-made objects covering the past 5,000 years and more. The types of objects in the collection represent Sumerian, Akkadian, Assyrian, Babylonian and Islamic cultures and include objects made of stones, glass, pottery, metal, ivory, and parchment, among others.

A statue of Nabu, the 8th century BCE Assyrian god of wisdom, stands before the building of the Iraq Museum.
A statue of Nabu, the 8th century BCE Assyrian god of wisdom, stands before the building of the Iraq Museum.

According to the American Journal of Archaeology, the Iraq Museum was founded in 1923 when Gertrude Bell, the British woman who helped establish the nation of Iraq, stopped the archaeologists from taking out of the country all of his extraordinary third-millennium BCE finds from the ancient Sumerian city of Ur (esp. the jewellery of the royal cemetery) for division between the British Museum in London and the University of Pennsylvania’s Museum in Philadelphia. She believed that the Iraqi people should have a share of this archaeological discovery made in their homeland and, thereby, started a museum in central Baghdad, pressing into service two rooms in an Ottoman barracks as its very first galleries. Later on, the museum was shifted to this new premises and formally opened in 1966.

The Assyrian Hall, National Museum of Iraq
The Assyrian Hall, National Museum of Iraq, Baghdad.
A 3 millenium BCE statue of a lion greeted us as we entered the Iraq Museum
A 3 millennium BCE statue of a lion greeted us as we entered the Iraq Museum

The museum enshrines Iraq as the cradle of civilisation, the source of writing and statehood. Their collection covers over 5,000 years of Mesopotamian history. The protection of a museum’s holdings in times of warfare or civil unrest is a multifaceted and complicated issue. Because museums present themselves as storehouses and display venues of treasure, they become targets of looting by organised gangs and by people from the street. The Iraq Museum estimates that some 15,000 pieces, including ancient statues, sculptures and cuneiform tablets, were pillaged in the aftermath of the US-led invasion in 2003 with a third to one-half returned or recovered before the museum reopened in 2015.

The Iraq Museum is one of the best archaeological museums in the world, containing the material evidence for the development of civilised human society from the very beginning of its history.

Skeletal remains of a Neanderthal man found in Shanidar cave in Rowanduz area of northern Mesopotamia dating back to c. 60,000-45,000 BCE.
Skeletal remains of a Neanderthal man found in Shanidar cave in Rowanduz area of northern Mesopotamia dating back to c. 60,000-45,000 BCE.

Iraq Museum-IMG_1571

God and Goddess of Hellenistic era from Hatra (c. 312-139 BCE)
God and Goddess of Hellenistic era from Hatra (c. 312-139 BCE)

Iraq Museum-IMG_1602

Iraq Museum-IMG_1603

Nabu is the ancient Mesopotamian patron god of literacy, the rational arts, scribes and wisdom. Nabu was worshipped by the Babylonians and the Assyrians. Nabu was known as Nisaba in the Sumerian pantheon and gained prominence among the Babylonians in the 1st millennium BCE when he was identified as the son of the god Marduk. He was also the inventor of writing and a divine scribe. Due to his role as an oracle, Nabu was associated with the Mesopotamian moon-god Sin.

A gigantic limestone statue of Nabu, god of knowledge and wisdom, found in one of gates of the Nebu temple dated to the 8th century BCE.
A gigantic limestone statue of Nabu, god of knowledge and wisdom, found in one of gates of the Nebu temple dated to the 8th century BCE. Characterised by the homogenous style and technique as well as conventional posture of a worshipper showing bent arms and clasped hands.
The palace reliefs
The palace reliefs were fixed to the walls of royal palaces forming continuous strips along the walls of large halls. The style apparently began after about 879 BCE, when Ashurnasirpal II moved the capital to Nimrud, near modern Mosul in northern Iraq. Compositions are arranged on slabs, or orthostats, typically about 7 feet high, using between one and three horizontal registers of images, with scenes generally reading from left to right. Orthostats are depicting royals, ministers are paying tributes and bringing gifts for the King.
An orthostat depicting a winged geni
An orthostat depicting a winged genie

A big pottery jar with Barbotine decorations with designs and motifs of lion heads, animals, human face, plant and geometric motifs found in Mosul belonging to fourteenth century.

We were unlucky as the Babylon Hall was closed for maintenance and documentation. I may have to visit again, at least for the Babylon Hall. This time my main attraction was the Lamassu.

8 thoughts on “Iraq Museum: Refuge for relics of the past

  1. It is interesting to know that a British lady helped to establish the Museum of Iraq and stopped the archaeologists from taking out of the country all the treasured artefacts. I am of the opinion that a country’s artefacts should remain within a country.
    Yet, though I may never get a chance to see the museum of Iraq, I can relate to some of these artefacts as many of these were present in the Museum of Pennsylvania and the British Museum, and I had a chance to visit both these museums.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Yes, I am also of the same opinion that relics of the country must remain with them. But most of the important relics are in the British museum, Louvre or in the Universities of the US. They took the advantage of the western imperialism in the 19th and 20th centuries.

      Liked by 2 people

  2. Hello, Indrajit. Your post reminds me the memory of reading the history book of school days.Babylon, The Mesopotamia civilization, etc hit my brain to remember the story of the civilization. I don’t know, whether I can visit Iraq or not. But, from now I’m including Iraq travel on my bucket list. Very nice post.

    Liked by 1 person

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